Your Cup of Tea 6: Ceylon

YUM Eat Cafe - teaThe coming weeks we introduce you to about 25 different natural health teas (without added flavours and other additives). Here the third part of the introduction. All teas at Yum Eat Cafe are served in-fusion.

YUM Eat Cafe serves 3 different Ceylon teas; each with their own characteristics.

Ceylon black tea is one of the country’s specialities. It has a crisp aroma reminiscent of citrus, and is used both unmixed and in blends. It is grown on numerous estates which vary in altitude and taste.

ceylon-tea

Ceylon green tea

ceylon-orange-pekoe

Ceylon green tea is mainly made from Assamese tea stock. It is grown in Idalgashinna in Uva Province. Ceylon green teas generally have the fuller body and the more pungent, rather malty, nutty flavour characteristic of the teas originating from Assamese seed stock. The tea grade names of most Ceylon green teas reflect traditional Chinese green tea nomenclature, such as tightly rolled gunpowder tea, or more open leaf tea grades with Chinese names like Chun Mee. Overall, the green teas from Sri Lanka have their own characteristics at this time – they tend to be darker in both the dry and infused leaf, and their flavour is richer; this could change in the future. As market demand preferences change, the Ceylon green tea producers start using more of the original Chinese, Indonesian, Japanese and Brazilian seed base, which produces the very light and sparkling bright yellow colour and more delicate, sweet flavour with which most of the world market associates green teas. At this time, Sri Lanka remains a very minor producer of green teas and its green teas, like those of India and Kenya, remain an acquired taste. Much of the green tea produced in Sri Lanka is exported to North Africa and Middle Eastern markets.

Ceylon white tea

ceylon-opri-petiagalla

Ceylon white tea, also known as “silver tips” is highly prized, and prices per kilogram are significantly higher than other teas. The tea was first grown at Nuwara Eliya near Adam’s Peak between 2,200–2,500 meters (7,218–8,202 ft). The tea is grown, harvested and rolled by hand with the leaves dried and withered in the sun. It has a delicate, very light liquoring with notes of pine & honey and a golden coppery infusion. ‘Virgin White Tea’ is also grown at the Handunugoda Tea Estate near Galle in the south of Sri Lanka.

 

 

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8 comments on “Your Cup of Tea 6: Ceylon

  1. Rory says:

    Very insightful and informative, I haven’t tried loose leaf Ceylon before, I’m looking forward to reviewing at http://teaandthat.com/ now!

    Liked by 1 person

  2. pinkiebag says:

    I have to confess to only having tried Ceylon black tea. I must try the others as it is a delicate tea I enjoy infrequently.
    http://pinkiebag.com/

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Wonderful information, I do drink green tea Sencha and Tamayokucha, never tried others so this is good info to know. Thanks for sharing

    Liked by 1 person

  4. I’m going to have to put the green made from Assamica on the “to buy” list…

    Liked by 1 person

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